Water

   • Water was much safer in olden times, but now it can contain poison and parasites (giardia and hepatitis). The best water is fast moving and at high elevations, and away from human habitation. Water should always be clear, never discolored or with an oil slick on the surface. Drinking water can be found in rock depressions or the crook of a tree or a stump, but be sure there is no algae or critters present. They may indicate that the water is stagnant. However, large sources of water should have plants growing in and around the water, along with fish and frogs. Animal tracks may also be present on the bank. All of these indicate the water may be safe, but remember that wild animals can drink water that is not fit for human consumption. All in all, there is no clear cut indication if water is safe to drink. Drinking contaminated water can result in stomach cramps and diarrhea. In a true wilderness situation, this can be fatal. Water that is muddy or has a lot of material suspended in it can be filtered with a cloth, or a hollow log with a grass mesh bottom and clean sand over the grass. After filtering, the water should be boiled for at least five minutes, but twenty minutes would be much better. Boiling will kill anything that is living in the water, but some chemical pollutants may remain. Water may also be found underground in dried creekbeds. Dig one or more holes in the creekbed and hopefully water will seep in. Gather the liquid with a cloth or dried grasses, and wring it over a container, then filter and boil. It may take over an hour for water to start seeping into the hole(s). Plants also are a source of water. In early spring, walnut, maple, birch and hickory trees can be tapped, while the sycamore can be tapped year round. Grape vines can be cut at the base, and water will drip out of the plant. You can also peel thistle stems and chew on them. Some cactus (water barrel and prickly pear) contain a high amount of moisture in their pulp. Another source of water is dew. Lick it up directly or collect it on a rag or dried grasses, and wring it into a container. In the winter you can use snow and ice as a water source, but it should be melted first. Chewing on snow doesn't cut your thirst, and your body uses a lot of energy melting the snow in your stomach.
   • Water was much safer in olden times, but now it can contain poison and parasites (giardia and hepatitis). The best water is fast moving and at high elevations, and away from human habitation. Water should always be clear, never discolored or with an oil slick on the surface. Drinking water can be found in rock depressions or the crook of a tree or a stump, but be sure there is no algae or critters present. They may indicate that the water is stagnant. However, large sources of water should have plants growing in and around the water, along with fish and frogs. Animal tracks may also be present on the bank. All of these indicate the water may be safe, but remember that wild animals can drink water that is not fit for human consumption. All in all, there is no clear cut indication if water is safe to drink. Drinking contaminated water can result in stomach cramps and diarrhea. In a true wilderness situation, this can be fatal. Water that is muddy or has a lot of material suspended in it can be filtered with a cloth, or a hollow log with a grass mesh bottom and clean sand over the grass. After filtering, the water should be boiled for at least five minutes, but twenty minutes would be much better. Boiling will kill anything that is living in the water, but some chemical pollutants may remain. Water may also be found underground in dried creekbeds. Dig one or more holes in the creekbed and hopefully water will seep in. Gather the liquid with a cloth or dried grasses, and wring it over a container, then filter and boil. It may take over an hour for water to start seeping into the hole(s). Plants also are a source of water. In early spring, walnut, maple, birch and hickory trees can be tapped, while the sycamore can be tapped year round. Grape vines can be cut at the base, and water will drip out of the plant. You can also peel thistle stems and chew on them. Some cactus (water barrel and prickly pear) contain a high amount of moisture in their pulp. Another source of water is dew. Lick it up directly or collect it on a rag or dried grasses, and wring it into a container. In the winter you can use snow and ice as a water source, but it should be melted first. Chewing on snow doesn't cut your thirst, and your body uses a lot of energy melting the snow in your stomach. See Wilderness Survival.
   • Bathing in running water will cure someone who has been changed into an animal by a witch.
   • Various forms of water torture were used. The famous Chinese Water Torture consisted of tying someone down on their back and having one drop of water at a time drop onto their forehead. After some time, this would drive the victim nearly crazy. Don't have a long time? Then try this quicker method. Tie the person down, clamp or seal their nose and force a funnel into their mouth. Water is then poured into the funnel, forcing the person swallow the water in order to breathe. Eventually this would cause the person to vomit (which may drown him if the water goes into his lungs), it could possibly even rupture the stomach, but I doubt this happened often. There was also the Dunking Stool. A stool was tied to one end of a giant seesaw, the end that overhung a creek, river or other body of water. A person was tied onto the stool, and it was lowered into the water where the person was held under for varying lengths of time. See Torture and Ordeals.

The writer's dictionary of science fiction, fantasy, horror and mythology. 2014.

Synonyms:
, , , / (for drink), , , , / (as cloth, to give it an undulating or wavy appearance)


Look at other dictionaries:

  • water — [wôt′ər, wät′ər] n. [ME < OE wæter, akin to Ger wasser < IE * wodōr < * wed , to wet (< base * awed , to moisten, flow) > Gr hydōr, water, L unda, a wave, Russ voda, water, Ir uisce, water] 1. the colorless, transparent liquid… …   English World dictionary

  • Water — Wa ter (w[add] t[ e]r), n. [AS. w[ae]ter; akin to OS. watar, OFries. wetir, weter, LG. & D. water, G. wasser, OHG. wazzar, Icel. vatn, Sw. vatten, Dan. vand, Goth. wat[=o], O. Slav. & Russ. voda, Gr. y dwr, Skr. udan water, ud to wet, and perhaps …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • water — ► NOUN 1) the liquid which forms the seas, lakes, rivers, and rain and is the basis of the fluids of living organisms. 2) (waters) an area of sea regarded as under the jurisdiction of a particular country. 3) (the waters) the water of a mineral… …   English terms dictionary

  • Water — Wa ter, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Watered}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Watering}.] [AS. w[ae]terian, gew[ae]terian.] [1913 Webster] 1. To wet or supply with water; to moisten; to overflow with water; to irrigate; as, to water land; to water flowers. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Water — Wa ter, v. i. 1. To shed, secrete, or fill with, water or liquid matter; as, his eyes began to water. [1913 Webster] If thine eyes can water for his death. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. To get or take in water; as, the ship put into port to water.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • water — / vater/ s.m. [abbrev. di water closet ]. [vaso di maiolica e relativo sciacquone collocati nella stanza da bagno] ▶◀ (pop.) cesso, gabinetto, tazza, vaso, water closet …   Enciclopedia Italiana

  • water — [n] pure liquid hydrogen and oxygen Adam’s ale*, aqua, aqua pura*, drink, H2O, rain, rainwater, saliva, tears; concept 467 water [v] dampen; put water in baptize, bathe, damp, dilute, doctor, douse, drench, drool, flood, hose, imbue, inundate,… …   New thesaurus

  • water — wa‧ter [ˈwɔːtə ǁ ˈwɒːtər, ˈwɑː ] verb water something → down phrasal verb [transitive] to make a suggestion, rule, or proposal less forceful by removing some parts of it: • A late amendment watered down the insider trading penalties to a £100,000 …   Financial and business terms

  • water — BALAST [pr.: uótăr balast] n. Tanc conţinând lestul lichid al unei nave şi fiind plasat în fundul dublu al acesteia. /<fr., engl. water balast Trimis de siveco, 22.08.2004. Sursa: NODEX …   Dicționar Român

  • wáter — wáter, water closet → váter …   Diccionario panhispánico de dudas

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